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  • Height, crown width, DBH, and height-to-crown distance collected using variable-radius plot sampling with a steel tape and a hand held compass to locate points along a transect. [ This document was provided by NASA's Global Change Master Directory. For more information on the source of this metadata please visit http://gcmd.nasa.gov/r/geoss/[GCMD]OTTER_TIMBER ]

  • The purpose of the SNF study was to improve our understanding of the relationship between remotely sensed observations and important biophysical parameters in the boreal forest. A key element of the experiment was the development of methodologies to measure forest stand characteristics to determine values of importance to both remote sensing and ecology. Parameters studied were biomass, leaf area index, above ground net primary productivity, bark area index and ground coverage by vegetation. Thirty two quaking aspen and thirty one black spruce sites were studied. Sites were chosen in uniform stands of aspen or spruce. Aspen stands were chosen to represent the full range of age and stem density of essentially pure aspen, of nearly complete canopy closure, and greater than two meters in height. Spruce stands ranged from very sparse stands on bog sites, to dense, closed stands on more productive peatlands. Diameter breast height (dbh), height of the tree and height of the first live branch were measured. For each plot, a two meter diameter subplot was defined at the center of each plot. Within this subplot, the percent of ground coverage by plants under one meter in height was determined by species. For the aspen sites, a visual estimation of the percent coverage of the canopy, subcanopy and understory vegetation was made in each plot. Dimension analysis of sampled trees were used to develop equations linking the convenience measurements taken at each site and the biophysical characteristics of interest (for example, LAI or biomass). Fifteen mountain maple and fifteen beaked hazelnut trees were also sampled and leaf area determined. These data were used to determine understory leaf area. The total above-ground biomass was estimated as the sum of the branch and bole biomass for a set of sacrificed trees. Total branch biomass was the sum of the estimated biomass of the sampled and unsampled branches. Total biomass is the sum of the branch and bole biomass. Net primary productivity was estimated from the average radial growth over five years measured from the segments cut from the boles and the terminal growth measured as the height increase of the tree. The models were used to back project five years and determine biomass at that time. The change in biomass over that time was used to determine the productivity. Measurements of the sacrificed trees were used to develop relationships between the biophysical parameters (biomass, leaf area index, bark area index and net primary productivity) and the measurements made at each site (diameter at breast height, tree height, crown depth and stem density). These relationships were then used to estimate biophysical characteristics for the aspen and spruce study sites that are provided in this data set. Biomass density was highest in stands of older, larger Aspen trees and decreased in younger stands with smaller, denser stems. LAI remains relatively constant once a full canopy is established with aspen's shade intolerance generally preventing development of LAI greater than two to three. Biomass density and projected LAI were much more variable for spruce than aspen. Spruce LAI and biomass density have a tight, nearly linear relationship. Stand attributes are often determined by site characteristics. However, differences between maximum LAI for aspen and spruce may also be related to differences in the leaf distribution within the canopy. [ This document was provided by NASA's Global Change Master Directory. For more information on the source of this metadata please visit http://gcmd.nasa.gov/r/geoss/[GCMD]SNF_BIOPHYS ]

  • Approximately 1000 published estimates of leaf area index (LAI) from nearly 400 unique field sites, covering the period 1932-2000, have been compiled into a single data set. LAI is a key parameter for global and regional models of biosphere/atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide, water vapor, etc. This data set provides a benchmark of typical values and ranges of LAI for a variety of biomes and land cover types, in support of model development and validation of satellite-derived remote sensing estimates of LAI and other vegetation parameters. The LAI data are linked to a bibliography of over 300 original-source references. These historical LAI data are mostly from natural and semi-natural (managed) ecosystems, although some agricultural estimates are also included. Caution is advised in using these data; they were collected using a wide range of methodologies and assumptions and may not be comparable among sites. Some attempts have been made to detect and flag the outliers in this data set, according to different biome/land cover classes. Needleleaf (coniferous) forests are by far the most commonly measured biome/land cover types in this compilation, with 22% of the measurements from temperate evergreen needleleaf forests, and boreal evergreen needleleaf forests and crops the next most common (about 9% each). About 40% of the records in the data set were published in the past 10 years (1991-2000), with a further 20% collected between 1981 and 1990. Mean LAI (+/- standard deviation), distributed between 15 biome/land cover classes, ranged from 1.31 +/- 0.85 for deserts to 8.72 +/- 4.32 for tree plantations, with evergreen forests (needleleaf and broadleaf) displaying the highest LAI among the natural vegetation classes. Further information on this data set is available from the link below: Leaf Area Index Data Citation: Cite this data set as follows: Scurlock, J. M. O., G. P. Asner, and S. T. Gower. 2001. Global Leaf Area Index from Field Measurements, 1932-2000. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. [ This document was provided by NASA's Global Change Master Directory. For more information on the source of this metadata please visit http://gcmd.nasa.gov/r/geoss/[GCMD]HISTORICAL_LAI ]

  • The purpose of the SNF study was to improve our understanding of the relationship between remotely sensed observations and important biophysical parameters in the boreal forest. A key element of the experiment was the development of methodologies to measure forest stand characteristics to determine values of importance to both remote sensing and ecology. Parameters studied were biomass, leaf area index, above ground net primary productivity, bark area index and ground coverage by vegetation. Thirty two quaking aspen and thirty one black spruce sites were studied. Sites were chosen in uniform stands of aspen or spruce. The dominant species in the site constituted over 80 percent, and usually over 95 percent, of the total tree density and basal area. Aspen stands were chosen to represent the full range of age and stem density of essentially pure aspen, of nearly complete canopy closure, and greater than two meters in height. Spruce stands ranged from very sparse stands on bog sites, to dense, closed stands on more productive peatlands. Use of multiple plots within each site allowed estimation of the importance of spatial variation in stand parameters. Within each plot, all woody stems greater than two meters in height were recorded by species and the following dimensions were measured: diameter breast height, height of the tree, height of the first live branch, and depth of crown. For each plot, a two meter diameter subplot was defined at the center of each plot. Within this subplot, the percent of ground coverage by plants under one meter in height was determined by species. These data, averaged for the five plots in each site, are presented in this data set (i.e., SNF Forest Understory Cover Data (Table)) in tabular format, e.g. plant species with a count for that species at each site. The same data are presented in the SNF Forest Understory Cover Data data set but are arranged with a row for each species and site and a percent ground coverage for each combination. [ This document was provided by NASA's Global Change Master Directory. For more information on the source of this metadata please visit http://gcmd.nasa.gov/r/geoss/[GCMD]SNF_TAB3_3T ]

  • The BOREAS TE-23 team collected hemispherical photographs in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on estimates of canopy architecture and radiative transfer properties for most BOREAS study sites. Various OA, OBS, OJP, YJP, and YA sites in the boreal forest were measured from May to August 1994. The hemispherical photographs were used to derive values of LAI, Leaf angle, Gap fraction, and Clumping index. This documentation describes these derived values. The derived data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The hemispherical photographs are stored in the original set of 42 CD-ROMs, that were supplied by TE-23. [ This document was provided by NASA's Global Change Master Directory. For more information on the source of this metadata please visit http://gcmd.nasa.gov/r/geoss/[GCMD]BOREAS_TE23ARCH ]

  • The BOREAS TF-11 team gathered a variety of data to complement their tower flux measurements collected at the SSA Fen site. This data set contains single-leaf gas exchange data from the SSA Fen site during 1994 and 1995. These leaf gas exchange properties were measured for the dominant vascular plants using portable gas exchange systems. [ This document was provided by NASA's Global Change Master Directory. For more information on the source of this metadata please visit http://gcmd.nasa.gov/r/geoss/[GCMD]BOREAS_TF11LEAF ]

  • The data set consists of a subset of the Climate, People, and Environment Program (CPEP) Global River Discharge Data Set for the study area of the Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) in South America (i.e., longitude 85 deg to 30 deg W, latitude 25 deg S to 10 deg N).The CPEP global river discharge data set is a compilation of monthly mean discharge data for over 2600 sites worldwide. The data sources are RivDIS 2.0, the United States Geological Survey, and the Brazilian National Department of Water and Electrical Energy. The period of record is variable, from 3 years to greater than 100.The purpose of this compilation is to provide detailed hydrographic information to the climate research community in as general a format as possible. Data is provided in units of meters cubed per second (m**3/sec) in ASCII format.Data from stations with less than 3 years of information or with basin area less than 5000 km2 were excluded from this compilation. Therefore, the original sources may have more sites available. No further documentation is available on this data set. Users should refer to the data originators for documentation. More information can be found at: ftp://daac.ornl.gov/data/lba/surf_hydro_and_water_chem/sage/comp/README/ [ This document was provided by NASA's Global Change Master Directory. For more information on the source of this metadata please visit http://gcmd.nasa.gov/r/geoss/[GCMD]lba_cpep ]

  • The BOREAS TE-12 team collected PAR data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on shoot geometry, leaf optical properties, leaf water potential, and leaf gas exchange. The data were collected at the SSA-OBS site from 04-Jul-1996 to 25-Jul-1996. [ This document was provided by NASA's Global Change Master Directory. For more information on the source of this metadata please visit http://gcmd.nasa.gov/r/geoss/[GCMD]BOREAS_TE12PARC ]

  • This data set is an expanded version of the Costa et al. (2000) data set and consists of a single grid with values of 1 for cells within the basins and 0 for cells outside. The resolution of the data set is 5 x 5 min (approximately 9 x 9 km). The area of this data set is consistent with the study area of the Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) in South America. The data file is in ASCII GRID format. [ This document was provided by NASA's Global Change Master Directory. For more information on the source of this metadata please visit http://gcmd.nasa.gov/r/geoss/[GCMD]lba_reg_basin ]

  • Productivity of a semi-desert steppe was determined at the Dzhanybek Research Station in Kazakhstan, between 1955 and 1989. A long time series of peak live biomass measurements are available from 1955 to 1989 (excluding 1976). More detailed data on the seasonal dynamics of above ground live biomass and dead matter are available for 1985-1989. These data are part of a series of grassland data sets recently assembled and checked by Dr. Tagir Gilmanov, which cover a wide range of climate and "continentality" (increasing maximum summer temperatures, decreasing precipitation) from the North-West to the South-East of the Commonwealth of Independent States (former USSR). Climate data for this site are also available: see Any Other Relevant Information in section 11 of this document. More information on the entire Net Primary Production Project can be found at the NPP homepage. [ This document was provided by NASA's Global Change Master Directory. For more information on the source of this metadata please visit http://gcmd.nasa.gov/r/geoss/[GCMD]NPP_DZH ]

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