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  • The PlanetScope satellite constellation, called ‘Flock’, consists of multiple launches of groups of individual Dove satellites into a 400 km orbit. Some of them were launched from the ISS. Therefore, on-orbit capacity is constantly improving in capability or quantity. Each Dove satellite is a CubeSat with a size of 10 x 10 x 34 cm. The complete PlanetScope constellation of approximately 130 satellites is able to image the entire land surface of the Earth every day, equating to a daily collection capacity of 200 million km². In 2014 the first Dove satellites started operationally acquiring images from the earth’s surface. The optical sensors mounted on the individual Dove satellites operate in the visual and near-infrared parts of the electromagnetic spectrum with a spatial resolution between 3 and 5 meters. A third generation of PlanetScope sensors (known as SuperDove or PSB.SD) is currently in orbit and is producing limited quantities of imagery with 5 spectral bands (BGRNIR + Red Edge). These satellites have the potential to produce imagery with 8 separate spectral bands. The RapidEye Science Archive (RESA), which allows Germany-based researchers to apply for free PlanetScope imagery, is operated by the German Satellite Data Archive (D-SDA) of DLR’s Earth Observation Center and can be accessed via the EOWEB Geoportal. New PlanetScope data as well as archive data which is not yet part of the RESA collections can be applied for at Planet Labs Germany GmbH under the RESA contract. For more information see: https://www.planet.com/resa/ This collection comprises the PlanetScope L3A OrthoTile products which are orthorectified as individual 25 km by 25 km tiles referenced to a fixed, standard image tile grid system. The OrthoTile products are radiometrically-, sensor-, and geometrically-corrected and aligned to a cartographic map projection. The Surface Reflectance layer which corrects for the effects of the Earth's atmosphere is included in the product.

  • The RapidEye Earth observation system comprised five satellites equipped with high-resolution optical sensors. Co-funded by the German Federal Government, the fleet of satellites was launched from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan in 2008. RapidEye is owned by Planet Labs, Inc.. It has been operated by Planet Labs Germany GmbH until the constellation was retired in March 2020. With all 5 satellites arranged in one orbit the RapidEye constellation was capable of taking images of the Earth's surface at high repeat rates with a maximum of 5 million km² per day. With a spatial resolution of 6.5m the 5-band sensors onboard the RapidEye satellites operated in the visible and near-infrared portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. For more information see: https://www.dlr.de/rd/en/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-2440/3586_read-5336/ The PlanetScope data of this collection has been purchased by the German Space Agency with funds from the Ministry of Economy and is available for Germany-based researchers for scientific use. The data collection is maintained by the German Satellite Data Archive (D-SDA) of DLR’s Earth Observation Center and can be accessed via the EOWEB Geoportal. The RapidEye Basic Scene (L1B) product is radiometrically- and sensor-corrected, providing imagery as seen from the spacecraft without correction for any geometric distortions inherent in the imaging process, and is not mapped to a cartographic projection. The imagery data is accompanied by all spacecraft telemetry necessary for the processing of the data into a geo-corrected form. For more details see: https://assets.planet.com/docs/Planet_Combined_Imagery_Product_Specs_letter_screen.pdf

  • The PlanetScope satellite constellation, called ‘Flock’, consists of multiple launches of groups of individual Dove satellites into a 400 km orbit. Some of them were launched from the ISS. Therefore, on-orbit capacity is constantly improving in capability or quantity. Each Dove satellite is a CubeSat with a size of 10 x 10 x 34 cm. The complete PlanetScope constellation of approximately 130 satellites is able to image the entire land surface of the Earth every day, equating to a daily collection capacity of 200 million km². In 2014 the first Dove satellites started operationally acquiring images from the earth’s surface. The optical sensors mounted on the individual Dove satellites operate in the visual and near-infrared parts of the electromagnetic spectrum with a spatial resolution between 3 and 5 meters. A third generation of PlanetScope sensors (known as SuperDove or PSB.SD) is currently in orbit and is producing limited quantities of imagery with 5 spectral bands (BGRNIR + Red Edge). These satellites have the potential to produce imagery with 8 separate spectral bands. The PlanetScope data of this collection has been purchased by the German Space Agency with funds from the Ministry of Economy and is available for Germany-based researchers for scientific use. The data collection is maintained by the German Satellite Data Archive (D-SDA) of DLR’s Earth Observation Center and can be accessed via the EOWEB Geoportal. This collection comprises the PlanetScope L1B Basic Scene 4-band multispectral image products with three visual RGB and one near-infrared band. The Basic Scene product is a scaled Top of Atmosphere Radiance (at sensor) and sensor corrected product, providing imagery as seen from the spacecraft without correction for any geometric distortions. It has a scene-based framing, and is not mapped to a cartographic projection. If available, the Surface Reflectance layer which corrects for the effects of the Earth's atmosphere is added to the product.

  • The SkySat constellation is comprised of 21 micro satellites with a size of 60 x 60 x 80 cm. SkySats can be tasked to acquire panchromatic and multispectral images of the Earth in high resolution (up to 50 centimeter) and at sub-daily frequency. They can also capture stereo imagery and video footage for up to 90 seconds. The first SkySat was launched in 2013, whereas higher resolution SkySat-C generation satellites were first launched in 2016. The SkySat constellation is owned and operated by Planet. The SkySat imagery of this collection covers specific test sites. The data has been purchased by the German Space Agency with funds from the Ministry of Economy and is available for Germany-based researchers for scientific use. The data collection is maintained by the German Satellite Data Archive (D-SDA) of DLR’s Earth Observation Center and can be accessed via the EOWEB Geoportal. This collection comprises SkySat Collect products. The Ortho Collect product is created by composing SkySat Ortho Scenes along an imaging strip into segments typically unifying approximately 60 SkySat Ortho Scenes. It includes multispectral (BGRN) as well as the panchromatic (PAN) assets. Radiometric corrections to correct for any sensor artifacts and transformation to top-of-atmosphere radiance are applied. If available, the atmospherically corrected Surface Reflectance layer is included. For more details see: https://assets.planet.com/docs/Planet_Combined_Imagery_Product_Specs_letter_screen.pdf

  • The SkySat constellation is comprised of 21 micro satellites with a size of 60 x 60 x 80 cm. SkySats can be tasked to acquire panchromatic and multispectral images of the Earth in high resolution (up to 50 centimeter) and at sub-daily frequency. They can also capture stereo imagery and video footage for up to 90 seconds. The first SkySat was launched in 2013, whereas higher resolution SkySat-C generation satellites were first launched in 2016. The SkySat constellation is owned and operated by Planet. The SkySat imagery of this collection covers specific test sites. The data has been purchased by the German Space Agency with funds from the Ministry of Economy and is available for Germany-based researchers for scientific use. The data collection is maintained by the German Satellite Data Archive (D-SDA) of DLR’s Earth Observation Center and can be accessed via the EOWEB Geoportal. This collection comprises SkySat Scene products. The Ortho Scene product is sensor- and geometrically-corrected, and is projected to a cartographic map projection. It includes multispectral (BGRN) as well as the panchromatic (PAN) assets. Radiometric corrections to correct for any sensor artifacts and transformation to top-of-atmosphere radiance are applied. If available, the atmospherically corrected Surface Reflectance layer is included. For more details see: https://assets.planet.com/docs/Planet_Combined_Imagery_Product_Specs_letter_screen.pdf

  • The RapidEye Earth observation system comprised five satellites equipped with high-resolution optical sensors. Co-funded by the German Federal Government, the fleet of satellites was launched from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan in 2008. RapidEye is owned by Planet Labs, Inc. It has been operated by Planet Labs Germany GmbH until the constellation was retired in March 2020. With all 5 satellites arranged in one orbit the RapidEye constellation was capable of taking images of the Earth's surface at high repeat rates with a maximum of 5 million km² per day. With a spatial resolution of 6.5m the 5-band sensors onboard the RapidEye satellites operated in the visible and near-infrared portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. For more information see: https://www.dlr.de/rd/en/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-2440/3586_read-5336/ The PlanetScope data of this collection has been purchased by the German Space Agency with funds from the Ministry of Economy and is available for Germany-based researchers for scientific use. The data collection is maintained by the German Satellite Data Archive (D-SDA) of DLR’s Earth Observation Center and can be accessed via the EOWEB Geoportal. The RapidEye Analytic Ortho Tile (L3A) product is orthorectified, multispectral data and is suitable for many data science and analytic applications that require imagery with an accurate geolocation and cartographic projection. It eliminates the perspective effect on the ground (not on buildings), restoring the geometry of a vertical shot. In addition to orthorectification, the imagery has radiometric corrections applied to correct for any sensor artifacts and transformation to at-sensor radiance. For more details see: https://assets.planet.com/docs/Planet_Combined_Imagery_Product_Specs_letter_screen.pdf

  • The PlanetScope satellite constellation, called ‘Flock’, consists of multiple launches of groups of individual Dove satellites into a 400 km orbit. Some of them were launched from the ISS. Therefore, on-orbit capacity is constantly improving in capability or quantity. Each Dove satellite is a CubeSat with a size of 10 x 10 x 34 cm. The complete PlanetScope constellation of approximately 130 satellites is able to image the entire land surface of the Earth every day, equating to a daily collection capacity of 200 million km². In 2014 the first Dove satellites started operationally acquiring images from the earth’s surface. The optical sensors mounted on the individual Dove satellites operate in the visual and near-infrared parts of the electromagnetic spectrum with a spatial resolution between 3 and 5 meters. A third generation of PlanetScope sensors (known as SuperDove or PSB.SD) is currently in orbit and is producing limited quantities of imagery with 5 spectral bands (BGRNIR + Red Edge). These satellites have the potential to produce imagery with 8 separate spectral bands. The PlanetScope data of this collection has been purchased by the German Space Agency with funds from the Ministry of Economy and is available for Germany-based researchers for scientific use. The data collection is maintained by the German Satellite Data Archive (D-SDA) of DLR’s Earth Observation Center and can be accessed via the EOWEB Geoportal. This collection comprises PlanetScope L1B Basic Scene 3-band natural color RGB products. The PlanetScope Basic Scene product is a Scaled Top of Atmosphere Radiance (at sensor) and sensor corrected product, providing imagery as seen from the spacecraft without correction for any geometric distortions inherent in the imaging process. It has a scene-based framing, and is not mapped to a cartographic projection.

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