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  • Cloud droplet number concentration is derived from MODerate Resolution Imager Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data from NASA's Terra platform. The MOD08_D3 daily data (collection 4 processing stream) on a grid of 1x1 degrees is used, which can be downloaded from http://eosdata.gsfc.nasa.gov/daac-bin/MODIS/Data_order.pl. From the joint histrogram of cloud optical thickness (COD) and cloud-top droplet effective radius (CDR) for liquid water clouds, CDNC is diagnosed assuming adiabatic clouds.

  • The product is automatically derived from Aqua/Terra (MODIS) satellite imagery in near-real time. It is an incremental product, meaning that the retrieved results are updated as soon as new input data becomes available over a timespan of ten days. Besides the fire perimeter and detection time, each feature contains information about the severity of the burning.

  • This product shows the mean snow cover duration (SCDmean), which is updated each year and consists of the arithmetic mean for the entire time series since the hydrological year 2001. The hydrological year begins in the meteorological autumn (October 1 of the previous year in the northern hemisphere or March 1 of the reference year in the southern hemisphere) and ends with the meteorological summer (northern hemisphere: August 31 of the reference year; southern hemisphere: February 28/29 of the following year). Analogous to the annual products for snow cover duration, the entire year as well as the early season (until mid-winter) and the late season (from mid-winter) are taken into account here. The “Global SnowPack” is derived from daily, operational MODIS snow cover product for each day since February 2000. Data gaps due to polar night and cloud cover are filled in several processing steps, which provides a unique global data set characterized by its high accuracy, spatial resolution of 500 meters and continuous future expansion. It consists of the two main elements daily snow cover extent (SCE) and seasonal snow cover duration (SCD; full and for early and late season). Both parameters have been designated by the WMO as essential climate variables, the accurate determination of which is important in order to be able to record the effects of climate change. Changes in the largest part of the cryosphere in terms of area have drastic effects on people and the environment. For more information please also refer to: Dietz, A.J., Kuenzer, C., Conrad, C., 2013. Snow-cover variability in central Asia between 2000 and 2011 derived from improved MODIS daily snow-cover products. International Journal of Remote Sensing 34, 3879–3902. https://doi.org/10.1080/01431161.2013.767480 Dietz, A.J., Kuenzer, C., Dech, S., 2015. Global SnowPack: a new set of snow cover parameters for studying status and dynamics of the planetary snow cover extent. Remote Sensing Letters 6, 844–853. https://doi.org/10.1080/2150704X.2015.1084551 Dietz, A.J., Wohner, C., Kuenzer, C., 2012. European Snow Cover Characteristics between 2000 and 2011 Derived from Improved MODIS Daily Snow Cover Products. Remote Sensing 4. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs4082432 Dietz, J.A., Conrad, C., Kuenzer, C., Gesell, G., Dech, S., 2014. Identifying Changing Snow Cover Characteristics in Central Asia between 1986 and 2014 from Remote Sensing Data. Remote Sensing 6. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs61212752 Rößler, S., Witt, M.S., Ikonen, J., Brown, I.A., Dietz, A.J., 2021. Remote Sensing of Snow Cover Variability and Its Influence on the Runoff of Sápmi’s Rivers. Geosciences 11, 130. https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences11030130

  • This product shows globally the daily snow cover extent (SCE). The snow cover extent is the result of the Global SnowPack processor's interpolation steps and all data gaps have been filled. Snow cover extent is updated daily and processed in near real time (3 days lag). In addition to the near real-time product (NRT_SCE), the entire annual data set is processed again after the end of a calendar year in order to close data gaps etc. and the result is made available as a quality-tested SCE product. There is also a quality layer for each day (SCE_Accuracy), which reflects the quality of the snow determination based on the time interval to the next "cloud-free" day, the time of year and the topographical/geographical location. The “Global SnowPack” is derived from daily, operational MODIS snow cover product for each day since February 2000. Data gaps due to polar night and cloud cover are filled in several processing steps, which provides a unique global data set characterized by its high accuracy, spatial resolution of 500 meters and continuous future expansion. It consists of the two main elements daily snow cover extent (SCE) and seasonal snow cover duration (SCD; full and for early and late season). Both parameters have been designated by the WMO as essential climate variables, the accurate determination of which is important in order to be able to record the effects of climate change. Changes in the largest part of the cryosphere in terms of area have drastic effects on people and the environment. For more information please also refer to: Dietz, A.J., Kuenzer, C., Conrad, C., 2013. Snow-cover variability in central Asia between 2000 and 2011 derived from improved MODIS daily snow-cover products. International Journal of Remote Sensing 34, 3879–3902. https://doi.org/10.1080/01431161.2013.767480 Dietz, A.J., Kuenzer, C., Dech, S., 2015. Global SnowPack: a new set of snow cover parameters for studying status and dynamics of the planetary snow cover extent. Remote Sensing Letters 6, 844–853. https://doi.org/10.1080/2150704X.2015.1084551 Dietz, A.J., Wohner, C., Kuenzer, C., 2012. European Snow Cover Characteristics between 2000 and 2011 Derived from Improved MODIS Daily Snow Cover Products. Remote Sensing 4. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs4082432 Dietz, J.A., Conrad, C., Kuenzer, C., Gesell, G., Dech, S., 2014. Identifying Changing Snow Cover Characteristics in Central Asia between 1986 and 2014 from Remote Sensing Data. Remote Sensing 6. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs61212752 Rößler, S., Witt, M.S., Ikonen, J., Brown, I.A., Dietz, A.J., 2021. Remote Sensing of Snow Cover Variability and Its Influence on the Runoff of Sápmi’s Rivers. Geosciences 11, 130. https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences11030130

  • This product shows the snow cover duration for a hydrological year. Its beginning differs from the calendar year, since some of the precipitation that falls in late autumn and winter falls as snow and only drains away when the snow melts in the following spring or summer. The meteorological seasons are used for subdivision and the hydrological year begins in autumn and ends in summer. The snow cover duration is made available for three time periods: the snow cover duration for the entire hydrological year (SCD), the early snow cover duration (SCDE), which extends from autumn to midwinter (), and the late snow cover duration (SCDL), which in turn extends over the period from mid-winter to the end of summer. For the northern hemisphere SCD lasts from September 1st to August 31st, for the southern hemisphere it lasts from March 1st to February 28th/29th. The SCDE lasts from September 1st to January 14th in the northern hemisphere and from March 1st to July 14th in the southern hemisphere. The SCDL lasts from January 15th to August 31st in the northern hemisphere and from July 15th to February 28th/29th in the southern hemisphere. The “Global SnowPack” is derived from daily, operational MODIS snow cover product for each day since February 2000. Data gaps due to polar night and cloud cover are filled in several processing steps, which provides a unique global data set characterized by its high accuracy, spatial resolution of 500 meters and continuous future expansion. It consists of the two main elements daily snow cover extent (SCE) and seasonal snow cover duration (SCD; full and for early and late season). Both parameters have been designated by the WMO as essential climate variables, the accurate determination of which is important in order to be able to record the effects of climate change. Changes in the largest part of the cryosphere in terms of area have drastic effects on people and the environment. For more information please also refer to: Dietz, A.J., Kuenzer, C., Conrad, C., 2013. Snow-cover variability in central Asia between 2000 and 2011 derived from improved MODIS daily snow-cover products. International Journal of Remote Sensing 34, 3879–3902. https://doi.org/10.1080/01431161.2013.767480 Dietz, A.J., Kuenzer, C., Dech, S., 2015. Global SnowPack: a new set of snow cover parameters for studying status and dynamics of the planetary snow cover extent. Remote Sensing Letters 6, 844–853. https://doi.org/10.1080/2150704X.2015.1084551 Dietz, A.J., Wohner, C., Kuenzer, C., 2012. European Snow Cover Characteristics between 2000 and 2011 Derived from Improved MODIS Daily Snow Cover Products. Remote Sensing 4. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs4082432 Dietz, J.A., Conrad, C., Kuenzer, C., Gesell, G., Dech, S., 2014. Identifying Changing Snow Cover Characteristics in Central Asia between 1986 and 2014 from Remote Sensing Data. Remote Sensing 6. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs61212752 Rößler, S., Witt, M.S., Ikonen, J., Brown, I.A., Dietz, A.J., 2021. Remote Sensing of Snow Cover Variability and Its Influence on the Runoff of Sápmi’s Rivers. Geosciences 11, 130. https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences11030130

  • The Global WaterPack is a dataset containing information about open surface water cover parameters on a global scale. The water detection is derived from daily, operational MODIS datasets for every year since 2003. The negative effects of polar darkness and cloud coverage are compensated by applying interpolation processing steps. Thereby, a unique global dataset can be provided that is characterized by its high temporal resolution of one day and a spatial resolution of 250 meter.

  • This collection contains monthly mean surface PM2.5 concentrations for Germany and parts of the surrounding countries. PM2.5 surface concentrations are derived from Aqua/MODIS and Sentinel-3A/SLSTR AOD data and provided as merged MODIS/SLSTR product. The data is generated by DLR and provided in the framework of the mFUND-Project "S-VELD". The surface PM2.5 data are concentrations with the unit "µg/m3". The satellites Aqua (NASA) and Sentinel-3 (Copernicus) observe Germany on a daily basis. PM2.5 concentrations were derived on a daily basis from the two AOD products separately and combined to a merged MODIS/SLSR surface PM2.5 product. The data within each month are averaged and gridded onto a regular UTM grid. As AOD measurements are strongly depending on cloud conditions, the spatial coverage can be limited, especially in the winter months.

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