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  • The diverse geology of Germany and the resulting use are the causes of a wide variety of ground motions, such as soil compaction, landslides, groundwater extraction, natural gas extraction, (abandoned) mining and cavern storage operations. The products of the Ground Motion Service Germany (BBD) are based on SAR data from the Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission and Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) processing. The BBD portal contains PSI data from the entire Federal Republic of Germany (approx. 360,000 km²). PSI technology enables precise measurements of ground motions in the mm range. The measuring points (Persistent Scatterer, PS) correspond to objects already present on the ground, such as buildings, infrastructure or natural objects such as rocks. Each PS is characterized by a velocity value averaged over several years (expressed in mm/year) and a time series of displacements. For each PS, the time series of displacements from the first Sentinel-1 acquisition to the last evaluated Sentinel-1 acquisition can be viewed. The PS are visualized according to the mean velocity along the line of sight (LOS) of the Sentinel-1 satellites according to the following convention in the BBD portal: - the green color corresponds to the PS, whose average speed is very low, between -2.0 and +2.0 mm/year, i.e. in the sensitivity range of the PSI technology; - those PS with a negative movement rate are visualized in the colors from yellow to red, i.e. movements away from the satellite; - the colors from turquoise to blue visualize those PS with a positive movement rate, i.e. PS that are approaching the satellite. The precision of the PSI data presented is on the order of typically +- 2 mm/year for the average velocity in LOS.

  • Between 1977 and 1983, the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR) took approx. 80,000 water samples and 70,000 sediment samples from streams and rivers in several sampling campaigns on the territory of the Federal Republic of Germany at that time and examined them geochemically. In addition to the geochemical prospection of areas with potentially deposits, the aim of the investigations was also to record indications of anthropogenic environmental pollution. The results of these investigations were published in the Geochemical Atlas of the Federal Republic of Germany (Fauth et al., 1985). The data collected within the framework of the Geochemical Atlas of the Federal Republic of Germany in 1985 is a geochemical survey of the former territory of the Federal Republic of Germany which is unique in its high sampling density. All later geochemical investigations were carried out with a much lower sampling density. This valuable and irretrievable data is now being made generally available via the BGR geoportals. In addition to the digital provision of the original data material, the texts from Fauth et al. (1985) and distribution maps produced according to the method used in 1985, the data were reprocessed using modern methods. The downloads show the distribution of Lead concentrations in stream waters in five different coloured point and colour shaded contour maps. In addition, the brief explanations on the element Lead from Fauth et al. (1985) are included.

  • GEMAS (Geochemical Mapping of Agricultural and Grazing Land Soil in Europe) is a cooperative project between the Geochemistry Expert Group of EuroGeoSurveys and Eurometeaux. In total, more than 60 international organisations and institutions worldwide were involved in the implementation of the project. During 2008 and 2009, a total of 2219 samples of agricultural (arable land soils, 0 – 20 cm, Ap samples) and 2127 samples of grazing land (pasture land soils, 0 – 10 cm, Gr samples) soil were collected at a density of 1 site/2 500 km² each from 33 European countries, covering an area of 5,600,000 km². In addition to the chemical element contents, soil properties and soil parameters such as pH, particle size distribution, effective cation exchange capacity (CEC), MIR spectra and magnetic susceptibility were investigated in the samples and some coefficients were calculated. The downloadable files present the areal distribution of the calculated CIA (Chemical Index of Alteration) in the shape of colour shaded contour maps.

  • The idea to represent the main features of the European Quaternary was first discussed at the Second Congress of the International Union for Quaternary Research (INQUA) held in Leningrad (St. Petersburg) in 1932. Compiled by the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR) in cooperation with the INQUA, the International Quaternary Map of Europe 1 : 2.500.000 was finished in 1995. It is jointly published by the BGR and UNESCO. Several Quaternary features such as end moraines, ground moraine hillocks, kames, drumlins, eskers and ice border lines are represented on the map. Additionally, the map shows the directions of ice movements, limits of marine transgressions and tectonic faults. Important localities of Quaternary discovery relating to both geology and prehistory, bathymetric lines and recent deposits covering the sea floor are also indicated as well. The legend on each of the 14 map sheets is in German and, depending on the territories covered, in English, French or Russian. The general legend is placed on map sheet number 15.

  • GEMAS (Geochemical Mapping of Agricultural and Grazing Land Soil in Europe) is a cooperative project between the Geochemistry Expert Group of EuroGeoSurveys and Eurometeaux. In total, more than 60 international organisations and institutions worldwide were involved in the implementation of the project. During 2008 and 2009, a total of 2219 samples of agricultural (arable land soils, 0 – 20 cm, Ap samples) and 2127 samples of grazing land (pasture land soils, 0 – 10 cm, Gr samples) soil were collected at a density of 1 site/2 500 km² each from 33 European countries, covering an area of 5,600,000 km². All samples were analysed for 52 chemical elements after an aqua regia extraction, 41 by XRF (total), TC and TOC. In the agricultural soil samples, 57 elements in a mobile metal ion (MMI®) extraction and Pb isotopes ratios were also analysed. In addition to the chemical element contents, soil properties and soil parameters such as pH, particle size distribution, effective cation exchange capacity (CEC), MIR spectra and magnetic susceptibility were investigated and some coefficients were calculated. All analytical results were subject to tight external quality control procedures. The GEMAS project thus provides for the first time fully harmonised data for element concentrations and bioavailability of the elements at the continental (European) scale. The geochemical maps provided in the data series “GEMAS - Single element maps” and “GEMAS - Parameters and indices” show an unbiased representation of the distribution patterns of the investigated elements and parameters. The data series “GEMAS - Supporting information” provides additional information to support the interpretation of these geochemical maps. The data set “Annual precipitation” belonging to this data series provides maps of the annual precipitation in the project survey area in the years 1960-1990 and 1970-2000 (data sources: UCDAVIS, worldclim.org).

  • The map of gravel deposits on a scale of 1 : 250,000 shows the distribution of sediments that contain gravel. The gravel fractions in the upper 0.2 m below the seabed surface are shown over the entire area. In the depth intervals 0-1 m, 1-2 m and 2-3 m, the gravel occurrences are additionally mapped selectively, depending on the drilling data. The proportion of gravel in the sediment is subdivided into five classes, each in gradations of 20 wt.% gravel. The maps are based on sediment samples taken from the seabed surface down to a depth of 0.2 m and on layer descriptions from boreholes.

  • Potential maps at a scale of 1:500,000 are available for the area of the central German North Sea sector, which show the distribution of potential storage and barrier complexes and their worthiness for investigation according to the criteria of the Storage Cadastre Germany (Müller & Reinhold, 2011).

  • Between 1977 and 1983, the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR) took approx. 80,000 water samples and 70,000 sediment samples from streams and rivers in several sampling campaigns on the territory of the Federal Republic of Germany at that time and examined them geochemically. In addition to the geochemical prospection of areas with potentially deposits, the aim of the investigations was also to record indications of anthropogenic environmental pollution. The results of these investigations were published in the Geochemical Atlas of the Federal Republic of Germany (Fauth et al., 1985). The data collected within the framework of the Geochemical Atlas of the Federal Republic of Germany in 1985 is a geochemical survey of the former territory of the Federal Republic of Germany which is unique in its high sampling density. All later geochemical investigations were carried out with a much lower sampling density. This valuable and irretrievable data is now being made generally available via the BGR geoportals. In addition to the digital provision of the original data material, the texts from Fauth et al. (1985) and distribution maps produced according to the method used in 1985, the data were reprocessed using modern methods. The downloads show the distribution of Cadmium concentrations in stream sediments in five different coloured point and colour shaded contour maps. In addition, the brief explanations on the element Cadmium from Fauth et al. (1985) are included.

  • GEMAS (Geochemical Mapping of Agricultural and Grazing Land Soil in Europe) is a cooperative project between the Geochemistry Expert Group of EuroGeoSurveys and Eurometeaux. In total, more than 60 international organisations and institutions worldwide were involved in the implementation of the project. During 2008 and 2009, a total of 2219 samples of agricultural (arable land soils, 0 – 20 cm, Ap samples) and 2127 samples of grazing land (pasture land soils, 0 – 10 cm, Gr samples) soil were collected at a density of 1 site/2 500 km² each from 33 European countries, covering an area of 5,600,000 km². In addition to the chemical element contents, soil properties and soil parameters such as pH, particle size distribution, effective cation exchange capacity (CEC), MIR spectra and magnetic susceptibility were investigated in the samples and some coefficients were calculated. The downloadable files present the areal distribution of the determined Kd values (soil-solution partitioning values) for Lead (Pb) in the shape of colour shaded contour maps.

  • The maps show the depths of 18 interpreted horizons from the base of the stratigraphically oldest Upper Rotliegend to the Middle Miocene unconformity. These representations are based on the evaluation of 10 deep boreholes and a close-meshed 2D seismic network. In addition to the reinterpretation of stratigraphic horizons already mapped in the Geotectonic Atlas of Northwest Germany and the German North Sea Sector (GTA) (Baldschuhn et al. 2001), further horizons were interpreted in particular in the Triassic sequence and in the Upper Rotliegend. The depth of each horizon is indicated by colour graded classes and depth contours. In addition to the depth of the respective horizons, the maps also show the distribution boundaries of the mapped formations (mostly caused by erosion, faulting and outcropping diapirs) and salt structures adjacent to the study area.

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