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  • BGR conducted within the project „Airborne geophysical surveys for mapping the shallow subsurface in Germany “ (D-AERO) airborne surveys at the German North Sea coast. The survey area Langeoog (2008/09) comprises the island of Langeoog, the western portion of the island of Spiekeroog, the Wadden Sea to the south of the islands as well as an onshore stripe ranging from about Dornum in the west to Werdum in the east. The size of the area is about 259 km². The area was surveyed with 12 flights totalling to 946 line-km (27,882 survey points). The nominal separation of the 68 N-S lines and 7 W-E tie lines was 250 m and 2000 m, respectively. The maps display the total count, the (equivalent) content of potassium, uranium and thorium as well as the exposure rate at ground.

  • The series "Geoscience Map of Germany 1: 2 000 000" contains easily comprehensible maps on various topics. The base map "Geology" shows Germany and the adjacent areas in 30 units, differentiated by the formation age. In addition, areas with igneous and metamorphic (formed by shaping) rocks are reported. 5 different types of lines provide an overview of fracture zones in the subsurface. In addition, the expansions of the last ice age are included. A schematic cross section through the surface from south to north shows the structure of the older basement and its cover by younger rocks. It is available in two versions: one with a simple topography and once, for better orientation, with the network of interstate highways. The map "Important deposits" shows deposits and mines of energy raw materials, metal materials, industrial minerals and salts based on a simplified, time-structured geology within Germany.

  • The map shows spatial units of Germany that can be uniformly described and delimited with respect to the type of flow as well as the chemical composition of the groundwater. In total, a distinction is made between five regions and 24 subregions, which have been assigned to the most important landscape units in Germany. For each subregion, a schematic lithological column profile has been compiled, showing a typical layered structure of the subsurface of each region. The types of rock are additionally subdivided into aquifers, aquitards and aquicludes. The aquifers are classified into the three classes of pore, fractured and karst aquifers, while the aquitards are divided into unconsolidated or consolidated rocks. Another distinction is made according to the prevailing chemical environment of the rock (silicate, carbonate, sulphate, organic). As a result, ten types of aquifers and six types of aquitards are distinguished. The basis for the map is the digital data of the Geological Map of Germany 1:1,000,000 (GK1000).

  • The idea to represent the main features of the European Quaternary was first discussed at the Second Congress of the International Union for Quaternary Research (INQUA) held in Leningrad (St. Petersburg) in 1932. Compiled by the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR) in cooperation with the INQUA, the International Quaternary Map of Europe 1 : 2.500.000 was finished in 1995. It is jointly published by the BGR and UNESCO. Several Quaternary features such as end moraines, ground moraine hillocks, kames, drumlins, eskers and ice border lines are represented on the map. Additionally, the map shows the directions of ice movements, limits of marine transgressions and tectonic faults. Important localities of Quaternary discovery relating to both geology and prehistory, bathymetric lines and recent deposits covering the sea floor are also indicated as well. The legend on each of the 14 map sheets is in German and, depending on the territories covered, in English, French or Russian. The general legend is placed on map sheet number 15.

  • In the map, all strata are first classified in the four main types “pore aquifers”, “combined pore and fractured aquifers”, “fractured and karst aquifers” and “aquitards and aquicludes”. Further differentiation is made depending on the areal extent and productivity of the aquifers according to the classification of the Standard Legend for Hydrogeological Maps (SLHyM). The productivity classes have been derived from permeability values. In addition, the surface strata are divided into 19 different types of consolidated or unconsolidated rocks and four types of covering layers. Furthermore, the map shows salinity zones of near-surface groundwater in inland areas, as well as zones of saltwater intrusions along the coast. Areas in which groundwater is affected by mining are also shown. The map “Hydrogeology” is based on the digital Geological Map of Germany 1:1,000,000 (GK1000) published by BGR in 1993. The digital GK1000 contains attributes for the stratigraphy, lithology and genesis of the rocks.

  • The International Hydrogeological Map of Europe, scale 1:1,500,000 is a series of general hydrogeological maps comprising 25 map sheets with explanatory notes, covering the whole European continent and parts of the Near East. The national contributions to this map series were compiled by hydrogeologists and experts in related sciences of the countries concerned under the auspices of the International Association of Hydrogeologists (IAH) and its Commission on Hydrogeological Maps (COHYM). The project is supported by the Commission for the Geological Map of the World (CGMW).The scientific editorial work is supported financially by the Government of the Federal Republic of Germany through the Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR) and by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). These organizations are responsible for the cartography, printing and publication of the map sheets and explanatory notes.The series of hydrogeological maps seeks to represent the hydrogeological setting of Europe as a whole without regard to political boundaries. Together with the information presented in the accompanying explanatory notes, the map can be used for scientific purposes, for large-scale regional planning and as a basis for detailed hydrogeological mapping.

  • The International Hydrogeological Map of Europe, scale 1:1,500,000 is a series of general hydrogeological maps comprising 25 map sheets with explanatory notes, covering the whole European continent and parts of the Near East. The national contributions to this map series were compiled by hydrogeologists and experts in related sciences of the countries concerned under the auspices of the International Association of Hydrogeologists (IAH) and its Commission on Hydrogeological Maps (COHYM). The project is supported by the Commission for the Geological Map of the World (CGMW).The scientific editorial work is supported financially by the Government of the Federal Republic of Germany through the Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR) and by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). These organizations are responsible for the cartography, printing and publication of the map sheets and explanatory notes.The series of hydrogeological maps seeks to represent the hydrogeological setting of Europe as a whole without regard to political boundaries. Together with the information presented in the accompanying explanatory notes, the map can be used for scientific purposes, for large-scale regional planning and as a basis for detailed hydrogeological mapping.

  • The International Hydrogeological Map of Europe, scale 1:1,500,000 is a series of general hydrogeological maps comprising 25 map sheets with explanatory notes, covering the whole European continent and parts of the Near East. The national contributions to this map series were compiled by hydrogeologists and experts in related sciences of the countries concerned under the auspices of the International Association of Hydrogeologists (IAH) and its Commission on Hydrogeological Maps (COHYM). The project is supported by the Commission for the Geological Map of the World (CGMW).The scientific editorial work is supported financially by the Government of the Federal Republic of Germany through the Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR) and by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). These organizations are responsible for the cartography, printing and publication of the map sheets and explanatory notes.The series of hydrogeological maps seeks to represent the hydrogeological setting of Europe as a whole without regard to political boundaries. Together with the information presented in the accompanying explanatory notes, the map can be used for scientific purposes, for large-scale regional planning and as a basis for detailed hydrogeological mapping.

  • The idea to represent the main features of the European Quaternary was first discussed at the Second Congress of the International Union for Quaternary Research (INQUA) held in Leningrad (St. Petersburg) in 1932. Compiled by the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR) in cooperation with the INQUA, the International Quaternary Map of Europe 1 : 2.500.000 was finished in 1995. It is jointly published by the BGR and UNESCO. Several Quaternary features such as end moraines, ground moraine hillocks, kames, drumlins, eskers and ice border lines are represented on the map. Additionally, the map shows the directions of ice movements, limits of marine transgressions and tectonic faults. Important localities of Quaternary discovery relating to both geology and prehistory, bathymetric lines and recent deposits covering the sea floor are also indicated as well. The legend on each of the 14 map sheets is in German and, depending on the territories covered, in English, French or Russian. The general legend is placed on map sheet number 15.

  • The idea to represent the main features of the European Quaternary was first discussed at the Second Congress of the International Union for Quaternary Research (INQUA) held in Leningrad (St. Petersburg) in 1932. Compiled by the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR) in cooperation with the INQUA, the International Quaternary Map of Europe 1 : 2.500.000 was finished in 1995. It is jointly published by the BGR and UNESCO. Several Quaternary features such as end moraines, ground moraine hillocks, kames, drumlins, eskers and ice border lines are represented on the map. Additionally, the map shows the directions of ice movements, limits of marine transgressions and tectonic faults. Important localities of Quaternary discovery relating to both geology and prehistory, bathymetric lines and recent deposits covering the sea floor are also indicated as well. The legend on each of the 14 map sheets is in German and, depending on the territories covered, in English, French or Russian. The general legend is placed on map sheet number 15.

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