Topic

 

biota

1081 record(s)

 

Provided by

Type of resources

Available actions

Topics

Keywords

Contact for the resource

Update frequencies

From 1 - 10 / 1081
  • This data set describes the nitrogen and chlorophyll content of small, monospecific canopies formed from seedlings of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and bigleaf maple (Acer macrophyllum). The trees were provided different levels of fertilization in order to produce canopies with varying nitrogen and chlorophyll concentration. For the Douglas-fir, fertilization was provided during the dormant season, so there were no differences in growth or leaf area among canopies, and canopies were at a constant density with varying foliar chemistry. For the maple, seedlings were aggregated at various densities, producing a matrix of leaf area as well as chemistry variations. Before destructive analysis for foliar chemistry, canopy reflectance was measured under natural sunlight (see ACCP Seedling Canopy Reflectance Spectra Data). [ This document was provided by NASA's Global Change Master Directory. For more information on the source of this metadata please visit http://gcmd.nasa.gov/r/geoss/[GCMD]ACCP_CANOPYCHEM ]

  • The purpose of these measurements was to determine plot-level average leaf concentrations of nitrogen, lignin, cellulose, etc. in order to investigate how AVIRIS reflectance measurements vary with chemistry. The plot-level leaf chemistry values were calculated from green leaf chemistry values and litterfall sample weights. [ This document was provided by NASA's Global Change Master Directory. For more information on the source of this metadata please visit http://gcmd.nasa.gov/r/geoss/[GCMD]ACCP_PLOTCHEM ]

  • The NPP Database contains documented field measurements of NPP for global terrestrial sites compiled from published literature and other extant data sources. The NPP Database contains biomass dynamics, climate, and site-characteristics data georeferenced to each intensive site. A major goal of the data compilation is to use consistent and standard well-documented methods to estimate NPP from the field data. Other important components of the database include a summary, investigator contact information, and a list of key references for each site. As far as possible, the original principal investigator or his/her successor has been contacted to review the data and documentation. The NPP Database currently contains detailed data for over 60 intensive study sites. A majority of these sites are grasslands, the remainder being tropical forests, boreal forests, and tundra study sites. Some combination of above-ground annual peak live biomass data and/or seasonal biomass dynamics data are available for all sites. Many sites also have data on below-ground biomass and/or turnover. Estimates of net primary productivity are included, where available, for individual sites, and as part of the NPP Summary tables. Climate and soils data are available for all sites in varying degrees of detail. The sites have been grouped according to vegetation maps based upon Bailey ecoregions, Holdridge Life-Zones, Matthews vegetation classes, and Olson World Ecosystem Complexes. Previously compiled multi-site data sets of georeferenced NPP estimates are also provided. NPP estimates are available from a number of different collections, containing more than 1700 sites but with less information available for each individual site as compared to the intensive sites. Records for these sites typically include an NPP value, latitude and longitude, original source of the data, and sometimes information on vegetation type, management, soils, and local climate. More information on the entire Net Primary Productivity Project can be found at the NPP home page, with links to further details on individual study sites or multi-site collections. Users are encouraged to browse these Web pages to find details of original studies, methodologies, and original research contacts Data Citation: Cite the data sets using the following reference format: Author, P. A., and M. B. Author. Year. Data Set Title. Available on-line from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. For example: Williamson, P., and J. Pitman. 1999. NPP Grassland: Beacon Hill, U.K. 1972-1973. Available on-line from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. [ This document was provided by NASA's Global Change Master Directory. For more information on the source of this metadata please visit http://gcmd.nasa.gov/r/geoss/[GCMD]NPP_SCH ]

  • The Vegetation-Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project (VEMAP) was a large, collaborative, multi-institutional, international effort whose goal was to evaluate the sensitivity of terrestrial ecosystem and vegetation processes to altered climate forcing and elevated atmospheric CO2. Phase 1 of the VEMAP project developed historical (1895-1993) data sets of observed climate, soils, and vegetation compatible with the requirements of ecosystem models and vegetation distribution models. See the VEMAP Phase 1 User's Guide for more information.Phase 2 developed historical (1895-1993) gridded data sets of climate (temperature, precipitation, solar radiation, humidity, and wind speed) and projected (1994-2100) gridded annual and monthly climate data sets using output from two climate system models (CCCma (Canadian Centre for Climate Modeling and Analysis) and Hadley Centre models). See the VEMAP Phase 2 User's Guide for additional background information.Two Phase 2 model experiments were run. First, a set of selected biogeochemical models and coupled biogeochemical-biogeographical models were run from 1895 to 1993 to compare model responses to the historical time series and current ecosystem biogeochemistry. Second, these same models were run on the projected 1994 to 2100 data to compare their ecological responses to transient scenarios of climate and atmospheric CO2 change. Model runs were performed for daily, monthly, and annual gridded data sets. The output of the monthly model runs in VEMAP grid format are contained in this data set.The models investigated included five biogeochemical cycling models, which simulate plant production and nutrient cycles, but rely on a static land-cover type, and two dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) that combine biogeochemical cycling processes with dynamic biogeographical processes including succession and fire simulation.Biogeochemical Cycling ModelsBiome-BGC (BioGeochemical Cycles)CenturyCentury rxveg GTEC (Global Terrestrial Ecosystem Carbon Model)TEM (Terrestrial Ecosystem Model)Dynamic Global Vegetation ModelsLPJ (Lund-Potsdam-Jena MC1 (MC 5 modified Century)VEMAP 2 model intercomparison results have been published by Schimel et al.(2000), Bachelet et al. (2003) and Gordon and Famiglietti (2004). Related Data SetsAvailable on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center.VEMAP 2: U.S. ANNUAL CLIMATE, 1895-1993 VEMAP 2: U.S. MONTHLY CLIMATE, 1895-1993, VERSION 2 VEMAP 2: U.S. DAILY CLIMATE, 1895-1993 VEMAP 2: U.S. ANNUAL CLIMATE CHANGE SCENARIOS VEMAP 2: U.S. MONTHLY CLIMATE CHANGE SCENARIOS, VERSION 2 VEMAP 2: U.S. DAILY CLIMATE CHANGE SCENARIOS VEMAP 2: Annual Ecosystem Model Responses to U.S. Climate Change, 1994-2100. [ This document was provided by NASA's Global Change Master Directory. For more information on the source of this metadata please visit http://gcmd.nasa.gov/r/geoss/[GCMD]vemap2_monthly_rslts ]

  • This dataset is a 1:2 million scale forest cover map for the land area of the Krasnoyarsk Region, Russia. Thirty-two land cover classes are distinguished. These data were digitized from maps of the Atlas of Forests of the USSR (Anon. 1973). This map should not be strictly viewed as a map of actual forest cover, but rather as a map of dominant tree species. Very few tree species are defined, and generally, each polygon and color has only one tree species assigned to it. [ This document was provided by NASA's Global Change Master Directory. For more information on the source of this metadata please visit http://gcmd.nasa.gov/r/geoss/[GCMD]rlc_forest_cover ]

  • The purpose of the Superior National Forest (SNF) study was to improve our understanding of the relationship between remotely sensed observations and important biophysical parameters in the boreal forest. A key element of the experiment was the development of methodologies to measure forest stand characteristics to determine values of importance to both remote sensing and ecology. Parameters studied were biomass, leaf area index, above ground net primary productivity, bark area index and ground coverage by vegetation. Thirty two quaking aspen and thirty one black spruce sites were studied. For the aspen sites, in each plot a visual estimation of the percent coverage of the canopy, subcanopy and understory vegetation was made. The site averages of these coverage estimates are presented in this data set. [ This document was provided by NASA's Global Change Master Directory. For more information on the source of this metadata please visit http://gcmd.nasa.gov/r/geoss/[GCMD]SNF_ASP_CVR ]

  • Ecosystem simulation models use descriptive input parameters to establish the physiology, biochemistry, structure, and allocation patterns of vegetation functional types, or biomes. For single-stand simulations, it is possible to measure required data, but as spatial resolution increases, data availability decreases. Generalized biome parameterizations are then required. Undocumented parameter selection and unknown model sensitivity to parameter variation for larger-resolution simulations are currently the major limitations to global and regional modeling. We present documented input parameters for process-based ecosystem simulation models (specifically for the BIOME-BGC) for major natural temperate biomes. Parameter groups include the following: turnover and mortality; allocation; carbon to nitrogen ratios (C:N); the percent of plant material in labile, cellulose, and lignin pools; leaf morphology; leaf conductance rates and limitations; canopy water interception and light extinction; and the percent of leaf nitrogen in Rubisco (i.e., ribulose bisphosphate-1,5-carboxylase/oxygenase). Input parameters may also be used for other ecosystem models. [ This document was provided by NASA's Global Change Master Directory. For more information on the source of this metadata please visit http://gcmd.nasa.gov/r/geoss/[GCMD]white_parameters ]

  • The NPP Database contains documented field measurements of NPP for global terrestrial sites compiled from published literature and other extant data sources. The NPP Database contains biomass dynamics, climate, and site-characteristics data georeferenced to each intensive site. A major goal of the data compilation is to use consistent and standard well-documented methods to estimate NPP from the field data. Other important components of the database include a summary, investigator contact information, and a list of key references for each site. As far as possible, the original principal investigator or his/her successor has been contacted to review the data and documentation. The NPP Database currently contains detailed data for over 60 intensive study sites. A majority of these sites are grasslands, the remainder being tropical forests, boreal forests, and tundra study sites. Some combination of above-ground annual peak live biomass data and/or seasonal biomass dynamics data are available for all sites. Many sites also have data on below-ground biomass and/or turnover. Estimates of net primary productivity are included, where available, for individual sites, and as part of the NPP Summary tables. Climate and soils data are available for all sites in varying degrees of detail. The sites have been grouped according to vegetation maps based upon Bailey ecoregions, Holdridge Life-Zones, Matthews vegetation classes, and Olson World Ecosystem Complexes. Previously compiled multi-site data sets of georeferenced NPP estimates are also provided. NPP estimates are available from a number of different collections, containing more than 1700 sites but with less information available for each individual site as compared to the intensive sites. Records for these sites typically include an NPP value, latitude and longitude, original source of the data, and sometimes information on vegetation type, management, soils, and local climate. More information on the entire Net Primary Productivity Project can be found at the NPP home page, with links to further details on individual study sites or multi-site collections. Users are encouraged to browse these Web pages to find details of original studies, methodologies, and original research contacts. NPP data are available on-line from the ORNL Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Data Citation: Cite the data sets using the following reference format: Author, P. A., and M. B. Author. Year. Data Set Title. Available on-line from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. For example: Williamson, P., and J. Pitman. 1999. NPP Grassland: Beacon Hill, U.K. 1972-1973. Available on-line from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. [ This document was provided by NASA's Global Change Master Directory. For more information on the source of this metadata please visit http://gcmd.nasa.gov/r/geoss/[GCMD]JRN_NPP ]

  • The NPP Database contains documented field measurements of NPP for global terrestrial sites compiled from published literature and other extant data sources. The NPP Database contains biomass dynamics, climate, and site-characteristics data georeferenced to each intensive site. A major goal of the data compilation is to use consistent and standard well-documented methods to estimate NPP from the field data. Other important components of the database include a summary, investigator contact information, and a list of key references for each site. As far as possible, the original principal investigator or his/her successor has been contacted to review the data and documentation. The NPP Database currently contains detailed data for over 60 intensive study sites. A majority of these sites are grasslands, the remainder being tropical forests, boreal forests, and tundra study sites. Some combination of above-ground annual peak live biomass data and/or seasonal biomass dynamics data are available for all sites. Many sites also have data on below-ground biomass and/or turnover. Estimates of net primary productivity are included, where available, for individual sites, and as part of the NPP Summary tables. Climate and soils data are available for all sites in varying degrees of detail. The sites have been grouped according to vegetation maps based upon Bailey ecoregions, Holdridge Life-Zones, Matthews vegetation classes, and Olson World Ecosystem Complexes. Previously compiled multi-site data sets of georeferenced NPP estimates are also provided. NPP estimates are available from a number of different collections, containing more than 1700 sites but with less information available for each individual site as compared to the intensive sites. Records for these sites typically include an NPP value, latitude and longitude, original source of the data, and sometimes information on vegetation type, management, soils, and local climate. More information on the entire Net Primary Productivity Project can be found at the NPP home page, with links to further details on individual study sites or multi-site collections. Users are encouraged to browse these Web pages to find details of original studies, methodologies, and original research contacts. NPP data are available on-line from the ORNL Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Data Citation: Cite the data sets using the following reference format: Author, P. A., and M. B. Author. Year. Data Set Title. Available on-line from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. For example: Williamson, P., and J. Pitman. 1999. NPP Grassland: Beacon Hill, U.K. 1972-1973. Available on-line from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. [ This document was provided by NASA's Global Change Master Directory. For more information on the source of this metadata please visit http://gcmd.nasa.gov/r/geoss/[GCMD]BRD_NPP ]

  • The BOREAS TE-09 team collected several data sets related to chemical and photosynthetic properties of leaves in boreal forest tree species. This data set describes the relationship between Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR) levels and foliage nitrogen in samples from six sites in the BOREAS NSA. This information is useful for modeling the vertical distribution of carbon fixation for these different forest types in the boreal forest. The data were collected to quantify the relationship between PAR and leaf nitrogen of black spruce, jack pine, and aspen. [ This document was provided by NASA's Global Change Master Directory. For more information on the source of this metadata please visit http://gcmd.nasa.gov/r/geoss/[GCMD]BOREAS_TE09PND ]

Datenschutz | Impressum