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  • This dataset is derived from Russian forest fire imagery from the National Forest Fire Center of Russia archive that was collected by the Center of Remote Sensing, Institute of Solar Terrestrial Physics, Irkutsk, Russia for the 1998 and 1999 fire seasons. The data are vector (point) maps of forest fire locations (1998 and 1999) in ArcView shapefile format. [ This document was provided by NASA's Global Change Master Directory. For more information on the source of this metadata please visit http://gcmd.nasa.gov/r/geoss/[GCMD]rlc_forest_fires ]

  • The NPP Database contains documented field measurements of NPP for global terrestrial sites compiled from published literature and other extant data sources. The NPP Database contains biomass dynamics, climate, and site-characteristics data georeferenced to each intensive site. A major goal of the data compilation is to use consistent and standard well-documented methods to estimate NPP from the field data. Other important components of the database include a summary, investigator contact information, and a list of key references for each site. As far as possible, the original principal investigator or his/her successor has been contacted to review the data and documentation. The NPP Database currently contains detailed data for over 60 intensive study sites. A majority of these sites are grasslands, the remainder being tropical forests, boreal forests, and tundra study sites. Some combination of above-ground annual peak live biomass data and/or seasonal biomass dynamics data are available for all sites. Many sites also have data on below-ground biomass and/or turnover. Estimates of net primary productivity are included, where available, for individual sites, and as part of the NPP Summary tables. Climate and soils data are available for all sites in varying degrees of detail. The sites have been grouped according to vegetation maps based upon Bailey ecoregions, Holdridge Life-Zones, Matthews vegetation classes, and Olson World Ecosystem Complexes. Previously compiled multi-site data sets of georeferenced NPP estimates are also provided. NPP estimates are available from a number of different collections, containing more than 1700 sites but with less information available for each individual site as compared to the intensive sites. Records for these sites typically include an NPP value, latitude and longitude, original source of the data, and sometimes information on vegetation type, management, soils, and local climate. More information on the entire Net Primary Productivity Project can be found at the NPP home page, with links to further details on individual study sites or multi-site collections. Users are encouraged to browse these Web pages to find details of original studies, methodologies, and original research contacts. NPP data are available on-line from the ORNL Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Data Citation: Cite the data sets using the following reference format: Author, P. A., and M. B. Author. Year. Data Set Title. Available on-line from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. For example: Williamson, P., and J. Pitman. 1999. NPP Grassland: Beacon Hill, U.K. 1972-1973. Available on-line from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. [ This document was provided by NASA's Global Change Master Directory. For more information on the source of this metadata please visit http://gcmd.nasa.gov/r/geoss/[GCMD]NPP_NLS ]

  • Rooting depths were estimated from a global database of root profiles that was assembled from the primary literature to study relationships of abiotic and biotic factors associated with belowground vegetation structure. Variables used to characterize belowground vegetation structure include the depths above which 50% of all roots and 95% of all roots are located in the profile. For each root profile, information recorded includes latitude and longitude, elevation, soil texture, depth of organic horizons, type of roots measured (e.g., fine or total, live or dead), sampling methods, units of measurements (root mass, length, number, surface area), and sampling depth. [ This document was provided by NASA's Global Change Master Directory. For more information on the source of this metadata please visit http://gcmd.nasa.gov/r/geoss/[GCMD]root_profiles ]

  • The BOREAS TE-23 team collected hemispherical photographs in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on estimates of canopy architecture and radiative transfer properties for most BOREAS study sites. Various OA, OBS, OJP, YJP, and YA sites in the boreal forest were measured from May to August 1994. The hemispherical photographs were used to derive values of LAI, Leaf angle, Gap fraction, and Clumping index. This documentation describes these derived values. The derived data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The hemispherical photographs are stored in the original set of 42 CD-ROMs, that were supplied by TE-23. [ This document was provided by NASA's Global Change Master Directory. For more information on the source of this metadata please visit http://gcmd.nasa.gov/r/geoss/[GCMD]BOREAS_TE23ARCH ]

  • The data set consists of a subset for the study area of the Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) in South America (i.e., longitude 85 deg to 30 deg W, latitude 25 deg S to 10 deg N) of the 5-min resolution Global Potential Vegetation data set developed by Navin Ramankutty and Jon Foley at the University of Wisconsin. Data are available in both ASCII GRID and binary image file formats.The original map was derived at a 5-min resolution and contains natural vegetation classified into 15 types. This data set is derived mainly from the DISCover land cover data set, with the regions dominated by land use filled using the vegetation data set of Haxeltine and Prentice (1996). The data set represents the world's potential vegetation (i.e., vegetation that would most likely exist now in the absence of human activities), and not necessarily natural pre-settlement vegetation. This is because human activities such as fire suppression have mo dified the stages of succession at which vegetation communities exist.More information can be found at: ftp://daac.ornl.gov/data/lba/land_use_change/potential_vegetation/comp/README/ [ This document was provided by NASA's Global Change Master Directory. For more information on the source of this metadata please visit http://gcmd.nasa.gov/r/geoss/[GCMD]lba_pot_vege ]

  • The NPP Database contains documented field measurements of NPP for global terrestrial sites compiled from published literature and other extant data sources. The NPP Database contains biomass dynamics, climate, and site-characteristics data georeferenced to each intensive site. A major goal of the data compilation is to use consistent and standard well-documented methods to estimate NPP from the field data. Other important components of the database include a summary, investigator contact information, and a list of key references for each site. As far as possible, the original principal investigator or his/her successor has been contacted to review the data and documentation. The NPP Database currently contains detailed data for over 60 intensive study sites. A majority of these sites are grasslands, the remainder being tropical forests, boreal forests, and tundra study sites. Some combination of above-ground annual peak live biomass data and/or seasonal biomass dynamics data are available for all sites. Many sites also have data on below-ground biomass and/or turnover. Estimates of net primary productivity are included, where available, for individual sites, and as part of the NPP Summary tables. Climate and soils data are available for all sites in varying degrees of detail. The sites have been grouped according to vegetation maps based upon Bailey ecoregions, Holdridge Life-Zones, Matthews vegetation classes, and Olson World Ecosystem Complexes. Previously compiled multi-site data sets of georeferenced NPP estimates are also provided. NPP estimates are available from a number of different collections, containing more than 1700 sites but with less information available for each individual site as compared to the intensive sites. Records for these sites typically include an NPP value, latitude and longitude, original source of the data, and sometimes information on vegetation type, management, soils, and local climate. More information on the entire Net Primary Productivity Project can be found at the NPP home page, with links to further details on individual study sites or multi-site collections. Users are encouraged to browse these Web pages to find details of original studies, methodologies, and original research contacts. NPP data are available on-line from the ORNL Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Data Citation: Cite the data sets using the following reference format: Author, P. A., and M. B. Author. Year. Data Set Title. Available on-line from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. For example: Williamson, P., and J. Pitman. 1999. NPP Grassland: Beacon Hill, U.K. 1972-1973. Available on-line from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. [ This document was provided by NASA's Global Change Master Directory. For more information on the source of this metadata please visit http://gcmd.nasa.gov/r/geoss/[GCMD]BRD_NPP ]

  • The BOREAS RSS-17 team acquired and analyzed imaging radar data from the ESA's ERS-1 over a complete annual cycle at the BOREAS sites in Canada in 1994 to detect shifts in radar backscatter related to varying environmental conditions. This data set consists of dielectric constant profile measurements from selected trees at various BOREAS flux tower sites. The relative dielectric constant was measured at C-band (frequency = 5 GHz) as a function of depth into the trunk of three trees at each site. Measurements were made during April 1994 with an Applied Microwave Corporation field PDP fitted with a 0.358-cm (0.141-inch) diameter coaxial probe tip. [ This document was provided by NASA's Global Change Master Directory. For more information on the source of this metadata please visit http://gcmd.nasa.gov/r/geoss/[GCMD]BOREAS_RS17DIEL ]

  • The Vegetation-Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project (VEMAP) was a large, collaborative, multi-institutional, international effort whose goal was to evaluate the sensitivity of terrestrial ecosystem and vegetation processes to altered climate forcing and elevated atmospheric CO2. Phase 1 of the VEMAP project developed historical (1895-1993) data sets of observed climate, soils, and vegetation compatible with the requirements of ecosystem models and vegetation distribution models. See the VEMAP Phase 1 User's Guide for more information.Phase 2 developed historical (1895-1993) gridded data sets of climate (temperature, precipitation, solar radiation, humidity, and wind speed) and projected (1994-2100) gridded annual and monthly climate data sets using output from two climate system models (CCCma (Canadian Centre for Climate Modeling and Analysis) and Hadley Centre models). See the VEMAP Phase 2 User's Guide for additional background information.Two Phase 2 model experiments were run. First, a set of selected biogeochemical models and coupled biogeochemical-biogeographical models were run from 1895 to 1993 to compare model responses to the historical time series and current ecosystem biogeochemistry. Second, these same models were run on the projected 1994 to 2100 data to compare their ecological responses to transient scenarios of climate and atmospheric CO2 change. Model runs were performed for daily, monthly, and annual gridded data sets. The output of the monthly model runs in VEMAP grid format are contained in this data set.The models investigated included five biogeochemical cycling models, which simulate plant production and nutrient cycles, but rely on a static land-cover type, and two dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) that combine biogeochemical cycling processes with dynamic biogeographical processes including succession and fire simulation.Biogeochemical Cycling ModelsBiome-BGC (BioGeochemical Cycles)CenturyCentury rxveg GTEC (Global Terrestrial Ecosystem Carbon Model)TEM (Terrestrial Ecosystem Model)Dynamic Global Vegetation ModelsLPJ (Lund-Potsdam-Jena MC1 (MC 5 modified Century)VEMAP 2 model intercomparison results have been published by Schimel et al.(2000), Bachelet et al. (2003) and Gordon and Famiglietti (2004). Related Data SetsAvailable on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center.VEMAP 2: U.S. ANNUAL CLIMATE, 1895-1993 VEMAP 2: U.S. MONTHLY CLIMATE, 1895-1993, VERSION 2 VEMAP 2: U.S. DAILY CLIMATE, 1895-1993 VEMAP 2: U.S. ANNUAL CLIMATE CHANGE SCENARIOS VEMAP 2: U.S. MONTHLY CLIMATE CHANGE SCENARIOS, VERSION 2 VEMAP 2: U.S. DAILY CLIMATE CHANGE SCENARIOS VEMAP 2: Annual Ecosystem Model Responses to U.S. Climate Change, 1994-2100. [ This document was provided by NASA's Global Change Master Directory. For more information on the source of this metadata please visit http://gcmd.nasa.gov/r/geoss/[GCMD]vemap2_monthly_rslts ]

  • The focus of this study was to quantify the effects of foliage removal by cattle on plant net primary productivity (NPP). The Vegetation Biomass, Production and Consumption at Selected Sites Data Set contains mean values and their variances. During the growing season of 1987, portable cattle exclosures were used to quantify above-ground plant biomass dynamics at each of four sites. All sites had been grazed each year and burned frequently during the preceding 10 years. Biomass was measured inside portable exclosures, outside exclosures (in unprotected vegetation), and inside permanent exclosures. Exclosures were moved to previously unsampled locations within a distance of 10 m after samples were obtained, and these remained in place until the next sampling date. [ This document was provided by NASA's Global Change Master Directory. For more information on the source of this metadata please visit http://gcmd.nasa.gov/r/geoss/[GCMD]FIFE_PLANTPRO ]

  • The BOREAS TE-02 team collected several data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on the respiration of the foliage, roots, and wood of boreal vegetation. This data set contains measurements of foliar respiration conducted in the NSA during the growing season of 1994. [ This document was provided by NASA's Global Change Master Directory. For more information on the source of this metadata please visit http://gcmd.nasa.gov/r/geoss/[GCMD]BOREAS_TE2FLRSP ]

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